10 Years of Sanctification

This April will be a special one. It will mark 10 years that I have been following Christ.

I truly can’t believe this anniversary has come so soon. That fateful day feels like just yesterday.

Many of my anniversary posts are just a recounting of my testimony, and while those are great, this time, I’d like to do something a little different.

Because while God opened my eyes to His glory and Lordship on April 25, 2010, I am not the same person I was in 2010, 2011, 2012, and so forth.

God gave me some kind of spirit of discernment early on in my walk (I never like prosperity gospel preachers and, back then, I really couldn’t explain why, but something [the Holy Spirit] told me to be weary of their teaching), but that same gift and zeal for sound doctrine was abused for a few years as I bullied brothers and sisters in the faith for not holding to the doctrines ol’ important me thought were most important.

I thought I was strong and able to “handle difficulty”, but I didn’t realize just how powerless I was until I was thrown into a barrage crazy trials some years ago. And yet, during some of the darkest times of my life (as a believer), I realized I wasn’t nearly as hopeless as I had been during an earlier trial in my life (one that happened before I was truly saved).

And those trials humbled me. I began to realize some of those Christians I disagreed with understood the love of God better than my own “clique” did. I began to realize it is okay to disagree on certain things. We are a family. Family will never agree on everything, but that doesn’t change the fact that we are all brothers and sisters.

10 years is quite a vantage point.

From here, I can look back at things I asked of God and say “I am so thankful You didn’t answer my prayers the way I wanted You to”.

It’s encouraging. And humbling.

My pastor recently said “I am not where I want to be, but thank God I am not who I used to be” and I couldn’t agree.

10 years ago, I thought I’d be this well learned theologian. I thought I’d written a book, be some kind of teacher, etc.

But 10 years ago, I was also too zealous for John Calvin and wasn’t zealous enough for Jesus Christ.

Am I still reformed? You bet.

Do I still think TULIP is the most accurate interpretation of scripture? Yup.

Am I still Cessationist? Well…I don’t really know. I’m beginning to lean Continuist, but I don’t really understand how the gifts work for the modern day church.

And that’s okay to say I don’t have all of the answers.

I do have one answer though: the Word of God is living and active, inerrant, inspired by the Holy Spirit, and is the foundation for all of our lives.

As long as it doesn’t contradict something clearly laid out in scripture, we can have some friendly debates on things, but let’s remember that our unity is more important to God than getting to say we won an argument.

“Nobody has ever been argued into the Kingdom, but many people have been loved there.” – Chad Moore

Grace & Peace Saints,

Christina

Fulfill Your Ministry

One of my favorite Matt Chandler clips is the one where he talks about Mark Driscoll.

Chances are, most people nowadays don’t know who Mark Driscoll was. If you do, that’s awesome. But if you don’t, he used to be the pastor of Mars Hill Church. He was also the founder of the Acts 29 Network (which Matt Chandler now leads, ironically.)

Any who, if you do know Driscoll, you also know he had a pretty aggressive way of preaching (which I won’t get into now because it’s besides the point).

Well, in this clip, Matt Chandler is coaching pastors and, in essence, he tells pastors that, though Mark Driscoll is very good at what He does and God uses it, we are not all called to be Driscoll.

We can not emulate him and expect the same results because God didn’t call us to be Driscoll.

God calls us to be ourselves. 

We aren’t called to fulfill Driscoll’s ministry. We’re call to fulfill OUR ministry.

God has shaped you specifically for a specific purpose. Though it may be tempting to look at “success stories” and want to emulate them, the truth of the matter is that what worked for Matt Chandler, Beth Moore, John Piper, etc, may not work for you.

You’re not called to fulfill their ministry.

You’re called to fulfill YOUR ministry.

Your ministry may be at home, with macaroni and cheese covered fingers. And yes, do I know it gets tiring changing diapers and trying to constantly entertain children, but it may be where God is calling you for this season. 

Your ministry may be at that job you don’t like, surrounded by those people who always gossip about their sins around the water cooler. Sure, you can’t wait to get out, but maybe, you’re called to be the light in a dark place. You’re called to point one of God’s future saints to the light. 

Your ministry may be in a not-so-great marriage. We’re not meant to divorce one another at the first offense. Maybe God called you to a marriage that starts a little hard, but as time passes, you grow from the trials and your love becomes an example of God’s power and healing.

(And don’t read what I am NOT saying. I’m saying that, for some, the trials serve to strengthen a marriage. I am not saying not to divorce an abusive spouse. Just throwing that disclaimer out there).

Simply put, we are all called to different ministries.

Fulfill YOUR ministry.

Why You Should Sponsor A Child

By the time your done reading this blog, at least 150 children around the world will have died due to poverty.

(According to UNICEF, 22,000 children die each day because they lack the means to afford proper care).

Their deaths are preventable.

Organizations like the one I work for (Expect Hope) make it their mission to rescue children from poverty and provide them with food, clothing, shelter, access to healthcare, and most importantly, love.

But WHY does your sponsorship matter?

Well, for one, not every country is the United States. Many countries do not have the means to help orphaned children, so many of them end up on the streets, naked and begging for food.

Many of those same children are targeted by terrorist groups like ISIS or Abu Sayyaf who promise them the same things Expect Hope does, but asks them to pay a hefty price; psychological abuse and, at times, sacrificing themselves for the terrorist groups cause.

There is no Child Protective Services to call in many third world countries. There is no Medicaid, no Free or Reduced Lunch, and sometimes, there isn’t even an option for free “public school”.

There are children right at this moment, walking along the streets naked and barefoot, with tummies rumbling, lacking ONE thing above all else; HOPE.

You could bring HOPE to a child today. You can change a life forever.

Some may say “well, $35 a month is a big ask”, but is it really?

My HULU subscription costs more than that.

Taking my family of four to Chipotle just once a month costs more than that.

Buying three new shirts at Ross costs more than that.

The truth is $35 equals to about $1.17 a day. We spend more than that on Starbucks, McDonalds, or whatever brand’s coffee you enjoy.

Think about that. Skipping Starbucks for 8-9 days a month will literally rescue an orphan from property and give them HOPE.

You can literally be someone’s hero for just $35 a month.

If you’re interested in sponsoring a child, visit Expect Hope today and sign up to sponsor. Still have questions? Comment below and I’ll do my best to get them.

Somethings you just don’t have to pray for.

Jesus said when you care for the least of these, you cared for Him.

Will you?

All Things Work Together

This isn’t the first time God showed me that He kept me from something for a reason.

A couple of years back, I realized something I thought to be perfect wasn’t so perfect after all. It was almost as if I could hear Him saying, “See? That’s why I didn’t let you go down that path“.

And a couple of days ago, I got that same revelation from a different circumstance: What can sometimes seem to be a punishment from God is actually protection.

I know this isn’t a new revelation for some (or even for me). I’ve often referenced in the past that God’s protection is much like a parent protecting a child. A parent will say “no” to a child who wants to run in the street to protect them from getting hit by a car. Even if that child wants nothing more in that moment than to play in the street, the more loving thing to do, as a parent, is to protect them from danger.

But a few days ago, that truth hit me a bit harder.

Through a conversation with a friend, I realized that, during a tough time in my life, God isolated me, not to punish me, but to prevent me, in every way, shape, and form, from doing something I would later regret. At the time, I was too emotionally vulnerable to realize that heading down certain paths would lead me away from God. So, being a loving Father, He isolated me.

It wasn’t punishment. It was protection.

Also a few days ago, the church we were attending decided to go in a different direction. I could write an entire blog post on this topic alone (I won’t, so don’t worry), but suffice it to say while some Christians would be perfectly fine with a decision they recently made, I am not one of those Christians (and we can love each other, yet respectfully disagree).

I tried to join this church multiple times (In other words, get involved, serve, lead groups, etc), but something always came up. The night service we went to as a family would be suspended for summer, my husband’s work schedule changed (making him unable to attend morning services or small groups), etc. I kept wondering why God was seemingly putting up road blocks at every chance to prevent me from getting involved with this church.

Once again, something I thought to be perfect wasn’t so perfect after all. And again, I could hear Him saying, “That’s why I didn’t let you go down that path“.

Back to square one we go.

But this time, I’m not so dismayed.

Even though my church made this decision, it is still a great church led by amazing people who love God and love the city of Phoenix. I still learned and grew as a follower of Christ there.

I don’t know where God is leading us, but I do know one this: All things work together for the good of those who love God.

All things are working together still.

 

We know that all things work together for the good of those who love God, who are called according to his purpose.
Romans 8:28

The Road Is Narrow

Yesterday, I was scrolling through my Facebook feed when I came across an article about Michael and Lisa Gungor. Honestly, I probably would have scrolled passed it had one word not been in the preview; Atheist.

Surely, “atheist” and “Christian artist” typically don’t go together, so I clicked the link and decided to see why this publication chose to use that word. They used it because that is what he considers himself now; an atheist.

This isn’t a blog post bashing Gungor (by all means, please spend time in prayer for him and his wife and pray that God opens their hearts and eyes to Himself once again). What this post serves as is a sobering realization that no one is safe from falling away from God.

I don’t mean to say that salvation is dependent on us or that we can lose it (because I think both of those are false), but what I do want to point out is (1) we are never in a “safe zone” with our faith and (2) there is no leader, celebrity, etc that is immune from sin.

To be honest, it hurt to see that someone like Michael Gungor had turned away from the faith. Someone who wrote songs like “Beautiful Things” and “Dry Bones” now would renounce those very words (based on my understanding of a few of his tweets and an article from his wife, but nonetheless).

It a sobering thought; any one of us could easily head down a slippery slope that could take us away from Christ and bring us to believe lies.

Enter through the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the road broad that leads to destruction, and there are many who go through it. How narrow is the gate and difficult the road that leads to life, and few find it.” – Matthew 7:13-14

As much as we may look up to Christian artists, pastors, teachers, etc, we need to realize that, at the end of the day, they are human beings with their own struggles and temptations. They are far from perfect, just as we are. They need community, the church, and most importantly Jesus Christ, just as much as we do.

I’ve often thought about those I started my Christian journey with. For those who don’t know, I had a blog on Tumblr and joined a community of fairly well-known Christian bloggers (within our own little community, of course). We were all young, restless, and reformed, ready to lead “the resurgence” in our own cities and spearhead this giant “revival” of sorts.

Many of those people have fallen away from the faith. Some have joined strange sects (that the reformed community would call heretical). Others just lost their passion for the Word of God.

Early in my walk with Christ, I met a group of college students who were passionate about the Word of God. I thought “surely”, these will be my life long friends who I stand with side by side to preach Christ to the world (or, at least, the city of Miami).

Some of those have also fallen away, lost interest, claimed heretical doctrines, etc.

And yet, some others have fallen into sin and fallen away from ministry (which is part of my husband and I’s story, if you didn’t already know that).

The road is narrow.

Man, pray for your leaders. Pray for those “celebrity pastors” that you listen to (Matt Chandler, John Piper, etc). Pray for the artists you enjoy music from. Road life is hard and the temptations are plenty. Pray for those you admire in the faith. Pray that your church stays away from false doctrines. Pray, pray, & pray, because only God has the power to keep a person. We get to contribute by praying, serving, loving, etc, but only God can keep a heart in His hands. Only God can change a heart to begin with.

May God keep us all until the very end so that we may hear those words, “well done, good and faithful servant”.

 

 

 

All My Hope Is In Jesus

Today, I don’t have a fancy post. I don’t have a verse I want to focus on or a direction for a blog post. Really, today, I just want to remind you, my brother or sister in the faith, of one truth that God has been reminding me of lately:

God is good. 

Our God is so good and so trustworthy. Even in the midst of the most difficult trials, He is working things for our good. There is a freedom that doesn’t compare to anything else when we sit back and say, “My entire life, 100% of it, is yours Lord. Do as you will“.

This song has really reminded me of that truth, so today, I just want to share it with you and pray that it will encourage and inspire you as well.

May all of your hope also be in Jesus.

Grace & Peace,
Christina

Phases

I’ve always loved flying in planes  For me, the best part is getting to see landing and takeoff from the window seat. These last two plane rides were no different; well, except for one thing.

I could tell very clearly that I was entering a new phase in life. 

While I was sad to see Miami, my hometown, get smaller and smaller as we ascended into the sky, seeing Phoenix right before we landed made me proud. Here was my new home and, for the first time, I was really happy to call it that; “HOME”.

It made me think about the many phases I’ve been through in life, both before and after knowing Christ. We all go through phases, sometimes for the better, and sometimes not so much.

For instance, when I was first saved, I found myself at a church that would scoff at the doctrines I hold close to now. But for the phase I was in on April 25, 2010, the day everything changed for me, that church was more than okay. It, too, has gone through its own phases. It has a different lead pastor, associates with a different group of people, and seems very different from the one I attended back in 2010.

When you have children, you can see some of these phases more clearly. My youngest daughter is a little over a year old, but I can clearly see how much she has grown when I look at newborn photos of her. The same can be said of my eldest daughter. This past week in Miami, many family members who hadn’t seen my almost 4-year-old for a while said the same thing upon seeing her; “wow, she has grown!”. Each phase has its blessings, but each phase also has its own unique set of challenges.

Politically, we can go through phases as well. In 2008, when I first started college, I was a proud “College/Young Republican”. I read conservative sites, watched conservative news, and thought Democrats were stupid and naive (we’re talking Pre-Jesus here, so please give “B.C. Christina” some grace). Now? I don’t consider myself a Democrat, but I am certainly no Republican. Both parties have issues, especially along their retrospective extremes. I think there is some good in both, but also some bad. I consider myself a Christian Independent who leans left on some things, but leans right on others.

Marriages go through phases. Relationships start with two people not knowing each other very well and, through time and work, getting to know each other better. Then you get married and you really get to know people! You grow as a person when you realize God can (and does) use your marriage to make your own flaws obvious. And while I’m not there yet, I know that marriages can (and do) blossom into lifelong partnerships that have withstood the test of 25, 50, even 75 years!

Friendships go through phases. In 2011, I had a core group of friends that I believed I would stay friends with for several years to come. Now? I’ve lost touch with many of those same people. Moving throughout the years, to two cities no less, has made it harder to not only keep old friendships active, but create new ones. I just now am beginning to feel more “settled” in Phoenix, but trying to create friendships that last as a stay at home mom of two kids, with one family car, who lives 20 minutes away from church is proving to be a bit difficult (to say the least).

We even go through phases in our walks with Christ. When I was first saved, I knew little about theology and doctrines, but like a young infant, I was hungry to get to know my Lord and Savior. I read every book I could get my hands on (which is a good and bad thing). I was always in the Word, any chance I could get (a blessing of being single with no children? Time). Then there was a phase when I knew of sound doctrine, but I belittled every person who didn’t agree with everything I believed (because Christina always knew better than everyone else). Not exactly the most “Christ-like” way to approach theology, but thankfully, the cage-stage is over. Now? I still believe in those same five points (jokingly referred to as “7 points”), but I don’t belittle those who don’t. I can feed the homeless alongside someone who believes in “free-will” and know we are both glorifying and serving God. I’d love to have a conversation with them about election and how the Bible supports it, but I’m not going to condemn a brother or sister in the faith because of it. And “election” shouldn’t dominate all my conversations with others; Jesus should be at the forefront, not simply doctrine.

Life goes through phases. Sometimes, we do need a friend to point our flaws in our thinking and lovingly guide us back to Christ (and Gospel-centered teaching). Sometimes, we’re that friend to someone else. Sometimes we’re right. Sometimes, not so much. Sometimes, we can feel loved just sitting with someone else over coffee for a few minutes and talking about trivial things like music or movies. Other times, we can be in a crowded room for hours and still feel completely alone.

The body of Christ will never all be in the same phase together…and that is a good thing. How can we learn from one another if we all have the same strengths and weaknesses? If I am prideful, it will take a humble Christian to point that out. If I am angry, it will take a level-headed Christian to help me with that. If I am selfish, only a selfless person could guide me. If I am prone to gossip, the one who isn’t will be the one to keep me accountable. If I want to learn about doctrines, I go to the one who has already known for quite some time. And if someone else wants to learn, and I know, I can teach them. If I am straying away from the Bible, it will take someone who hasn’t to bring me back. And if I see a brother or sister straying from sound teaching (on those “close-handed issues” that the Bible is very clear on, it is my staying firm but loving with them that may, indeed, bring them back. And if we begin to disagree on an open-handed one? It’s not my place to become angry and see them as suddenly unsaved, but to love them despite our differences and come together for the sake of Christ and the Gospel.

We all go through phases and, while I am sad to see some come and go, I am excited to see what God has in store for me and my family, in our new home, here in Phoenix, AZ.

Grace & Peace.

My Favorite Study Bible: The ESV MacArthur Study Bible

(The following post contains affliate links). 

When I was first saved, I didn’t know many other brothers and sisters in the faith. Because of this, I ended up walking into the nearest Christian book store and buying whatever I could find (which led to me reading some “questionable” things, to say the least).

Because of this, one thing I never want to stop doing on my blog is recommending theologically solid resources that will help you grow in your faith. So, without further ado, I present to you my favorite Bible study reference tool:

The ESV MacArthur Study Bible.

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I can not recommend this study Bible enough. It is my number one go-to resource for questions I have about scripture. While I will admit that I don’t agree 100% with John MacArthur (or any teacher, for that matter), he is an incredibly gifted Bible teacher. Every time I set out to read a chapter a day of scripture, I include a quick reading through that chapter’s commentary.

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Using an extremely detailed, verse-by-verse approach, John MacArthur breaks down just about each and every verse, giving full context and history details within the commentary. For those who don’t know, he is a pastor that is famous in the Reformed community for his expository preaching.

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You can also find maps and charts throughout the Study Bible. The one above charts out the miracles of Jesus and where you can find them specifically mentioned in the Gospels.

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You can also find maps in the back of the Bible visually depicting a variety of resources. Pictured below is a map of the twelve tribes of Israel.

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As I mentioned earlier, it is my go-to resource when I want to dig deeper into a specific passage or chapter. If I have a question and want to know the full context of something said, I usually pull out this Bible. I would recommend it for everyone and anyone looking to dig a little deeper into scripture (which should be all of us).

Not fond of the ESV? John MacArthur has a version of this Bible in NKJV and in NASB, if you’d prefer those translations.

As time goes by, I’ll be recommending more of my favorite resources for those interested!

Grace & Peace!

How A Christian Should Celebrate Independence Day

For I have often told you, and now say again with tears, that many live as enemies of the cross of Christ. Their end is destruction; their god is their stomach; their glory is in their shame. They are focused on earthly things, but our citizenship is in heaven, and we eagerly wait for a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ.
– Philippians 3:18-20 (emphasis mine)


There is nothing inherently wrong with being proud to be an American. 

America is a good country that allows many freedoms other countries do not. As Christians, we can be grateful that we live in a country where we won’t be killed for merely owning a Bible or speaking God’s Word to others. We can appreciate the easy access to other Christians, churches, biblical resources, etc, that other brothers and sisters throughout the world do not have.

But America is also not a perfect country. Many are still being oppressed to this day, in many different ways. And while we have improved somewhat, we are nowhere near being “great”. It’s not about “Making America Great Again”; we never were “great” to begin with. 

(And I know you want to get back to eating hot dogs and watching fireworks, so I’ll make this short, but some things needs to be said).

As Christians, here are some things to consider as we celebrate July 4th, AKA Independence Day:

  1. Although today is the national Independence Day, not every American was declared “independent” on this day. African-Americans were still enslaved when the Declaration of Independence was written. Women were not considered “smart” enough to be given the right to vote. Native Americans were first in “founding” this nation, and yet, were murdered and conquered by settlers who considered them “savages”. While women eventually got the right to vote, many of these issues have not been fixed completely (and we are still feeling the effects of it). So, while you and your “ancestors” were liberated on this, consider that many others weren’t.
  2. You can be proud to be American, but it should not be your primary identity. As believers and followers of Christ, we are given one identity and one alone: Christ Followers. And when we are united in Heaven with all other believers, there will be no “Americans”. We will all be one, a group of saints from every tribe, every tongue, and every nation. It’s fine to be happy that your team won in the olympics and what not, but you are not better than someone else because of your nation of birth. As a matter of fact, you have more in common with a Mexican or a Syrian who is Christian than a fellow American that isn’t. Keep that in mind.
  3. We shouldn’t be applying “freedom” verses to being American. I made a joke about this on my Twitter, but it’s a serious matter. Just as we shouldn’t take other verses out of context, we shouldn’t just slap a verse about “freedom in Christ” on a picture of the flag. You are NOT blessed because you’re a free American. You are blessed because you have been given freedom IN CHRIST, a freedom greater than any country on this Earth could possibly offer you. Spoiler alert: America didn’t exist when the Bible was written, so NOT A SINGLE VERSE specifically applies to American freedom.
  4. We are all made in God’s image. The Muslim. The Atheist. The Catholic. The Presbyterian. The Protestant. The Caucasian. The African. The European. The Indian. The Asian. The Mexican. The Cuban. The Puerto Rican. The Dominican. The Jamaican. The Syrian. The Iranian. The Russian. The German. The Australian. The Indigenous. EVERY. SINGLE. HUMAN. BEING. That said, there is no logic in saying one group of people is inherently “evil” or “demonic” or, quite simply, “less than”. If someone is putting down someone else because they’re Mexican or Muslim, that person probably doesn’t know Jesus. Point blank.
  5. AMERICA IS NOT GOD’S CHOSEN COUNTRY. Can I just say that again? AMERICA IS NOT GOD’S SPECIAL CHOSEN COUNTRY. God chose ONE people; Israel. And when Christ came and died on the cross, that promise opened up to all nations. There are elect on every continent, in every country, and of every skin tone and tongue. America has seen some common grace from God, but it is not a special country. As Russell Moore so eloquently explained, it is far from being a Christian nation. It may consider itself a “Christian nation”, but it is not one.
  6. Many of our favorite theologians weren’t American. Spurgeon? English. Dietrich Bonhoeffer? German. John Calvin? French. Martin Luther? German. We may have modern-day theologians like John Piper, RC Sproul, and John MacArthur, but we are but a dot in the history of many international theologians that have done great things for the faith.

Lastly, to quote a brother in Christ from one of my Facebook groups, “Be thankful for the liberty afforded to you to look to a better savior than a nation or president ever could be”.

Grace & Peace.

Lysa TerKeurst & Divorce

Divorce is never easy. 

Though I haven’t been through one, I am the child of divorced parents. Being that my parents divorced when I was a teenager, I have this odd upbringing of knowing what a “normal” family is supposed to look like, then suddenly having that taken away from me. I am no stranger to the negative consequences of divorce and, being a Christian and someone who passionately believes in Biblical Inerrancy, I don’t think God approves of most divorces.

That said, there are instances when God allows divorce and, if a brother or sister in the faith chooses divorce because of that specific instance, we can not call them a sinner or question why they “didn’t try harder”.

That’s not only unbiblical, but it’s a sin to treat our brothers and sisters callously. The Bible doesn’t say “all divorces are wrong”, but what it DOES say (in Romans 12:15) is to “mourn with those who mourn” (also translated “weep with those who weep“).

Which brings me to Lysa TerKeurst. 

A couple of days ago, a friend of mine commented on a Facebook post. I won’t call out the blog writer, so let’s just call their post “My Opinion On Divorce and Affairs“. After seeing my friend say he was disgusted by the blog, curiosity led me to read it for myself. What I found was mishandling of the Word of God and a shaming of a sister in Christ already going through a tough time.

And though the author may (or may not) deny that their blog post was about Lysa TerKeurst, it was most undeniably about a woman in her same situation. I will let you read Lysa’s blog for yourself, but to make a long story short, she is getting a divorce after dealing with her husband’s continuous affairs and substance abuse. She tried everything you’re supposed to try; prayer, counseling, couples intensives, therapy, etc. But her husband refused to repent and continued to sin, so she chose divorce.

She didn’t immediately divorce him (though, according to the Word of God, she had every right to). She tried to make it work, but she can only do so much if he refuses to change. Him not changing now exposes herself and her children not only to diseases, but to accidental exposure of substance abuse (and even possibly pornography, if that was a factor, which it usually is, but let’s not assume anything).

And once again, the Word of God allows her the right to divorce. 

Why then would the writer of the “My Opinion on Divorce and Affairs” blog ignore their biblical instruction to “mourn with those who mourn” and, instead, choose to assume she didn’t sleep with him enough, or she didn’t submit to him enough, or that she was too critical of him? Why, instead of offering words of kindness and compassion to a sister who is already going through so much, did she instead choose to anonymously refer to Lysa’s situation and criticize her by saying she hates that the women in these situations” fail to say anything they did to tear down their marriage,” (and that’s a real quote).

[Fact check: Most of the time, when one spouse brings sexual addiction into the marriage, the other spouse had NOTHING to do with that. It is an addiction that usually starts sometime in the teen years and had NOTHING to do with how available a spouse is or not. I’m not saying Lysa never did anything wrong. We’re all human and we all mess up. But Lysa, if you ever read this, that is NOT your fault. AT ALL.].

I’m not going to tear this blog writer apart. When I read things like this, I am tempted to (consider them literary temple tables, if you will), but I won’t. I would be no better than her, making assumptions about people I know nothing about. I will, instead, pray for her heart to be softened to the needs of Christian brothers and sisters.

And again, I don’t always agree with divorce. Even John Piper says that marriages can be saved after infidelity and, if you’re in that situation, you should try to save it. But given that Jesus HIMSELF said “I tell you, whoever divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another commits adultery,” (Matthew 19:9, emphasis mine),  and given that I don’t believe Jesus ever contradicted Himself (especially within a couple of sentences) I will take His words literally. 

Lastly, I want to speak to Lysa (and every woman who ever finds herself in Lysa’s spot):

Lysa,
What you are currently going through is a trial of incredible pain and anguish. First and foremost, I pray for sisters in the faith to surround you and be able to lift your head on days when even that much will seem too hard. I pray for sisters who will truly “weep with those who weep”, who will stand by you, encourage you, and wash you with the love of Christ. At the end of the day, true solace only comes from Christ, but He does bless us with brothers and sisters in the faith who tangibly demonstrate His love in our lives. And I pray for this over and over for you.

I pray God restores your husband and breaks him from this sin cycle. I believe restoration is possible. I believe full healing is possible. But as Matt Chandler says, “God can, I believe God will, but even if God doesn’t.” I believe God can bring restoration. I believe God WILL bring restoration. But even if He doesn’t, He is still good.

Lysa, do not listen to ill-informed blog writers who choose sinful criticism over their command to weep with you. Many women are praying for you and your family. You are not a tool to be used to garner page views. You are a human being, a woman loved and cherished by Jesus Christ, a woman made in the very image of God.

God bless you and your ministry and may He not only be glorified in this chaos, but may many come to know Him through your transparency and continued service with Proverbs 31.

Grace & Peace to all.